Stowe Trail Permit

Stowe Trail Permit

We have finally located where you need to go to get a permit to use the Stowe Trail.  Permits are only good for one year and everyone over the age of 10 must have one for walking, hiking, horseback riding, and biking.

Stowe Trail Permit will take you to the webpage set up by the Marines.

Here are some Q&A’s regarding the use of the trail.

Q1. What is the age required to obtain a permit?

A1. All U.S. citizens, 10 years of age and older, must obtain a permit in order to access Stowe Trail.  Approval of permits will depend on the results of background checks for adults and the completion of appropriate paperwork by all applicants.  Permit holders under the age of 18 must be accompanied by an adult permit holder.  Children under the age of 10 may access Stowe Trail with a permit-holding parent or legal guardian provided that the permit holder has a signed liability waiver on file for each child.

Q2. What will occur if someone accesses the trail without a permit?

A2. Persons who access Stowe Trail without a permit may be subject to citations, fines, and any other punitive measure as determined by the U.S. District Court. Specifically, these persons may be subject to a $500 fine and confiscation of property.

Q3. What are the ramifications of going off the trail?

A3. Persons who trespass onto trails other than Stowe Trail, and all persons who lack a permit, may be subject to citations and any other punitive measure as determined by the U.S. District Court. These persons may be subject to a $500 fine, confiscation of property, and loss of permit.

Q4. How do I know the boundaries of the trail?

A4. There are signs along the trail to ensure permit holders stay within the boundaries of the trail.

Q5. What is the helmet policy?

A5. Helmets are required while riding a bicycle aboard all U.S. Marine Corps installations.

Q6. Am I allowed to ride a motorized vehicle on the trail?

A6. No, motorized vehicles are prohibited from using Stowe Trail.

Q7. What forms of transportation are authorized on the trail?

A7. Activity while on the trail is restricted to recreational bicycling, hiking, and horseback riding; no intentional delay or other unauthorized activity is permitted.

Q8. Are there canine restrictions?

A8. Full or mixed breeds of Pit Bulls, Rottweilers, canid/wolf hybrids, and any other canine breed with dominant traits of aggression, present an unreasonable risk to the health and safety of personnel on Marine Corps installations and are prohibited.

Q9. Can my permit be revoked?

A9. Any disruptive, disorderly or illegal conduct may result in the permanent revocation of trail privileges and be subject to enforcement by law enforcement officials and prosecution under U.S. code.

Q10. Are items prohibited from being on the trail?

A10. Prohibited items include firearms, knives, replica or toy weapons, pepper spray, mace, stun guns, martial arts weapons, or other weapons of any kind (regardless of permit);  alcoholic beverages; drones (i.e. quad or hex copters); lasers or laser pointers;  and federally-banned substances such as illicit narcotics and marijuana.  State laws regarding medical and recreational marijuana are NOT recognized aboard MCAS Miramar, including Stowe Trail.

Q11. Are trail improvements and maintenance allowed?

A11. Any modification or other “improvement” of the trail is strictly prohibited unless specifically authorized by the commanding officer of MCAS Miramar.

What in the World is a Tarantula Hawk?

What in the World is a Tarantula Hawk?

When you hear of a tarantula hawk the first thing that comes to mind is that it is a hawk that eats tarantulas.   But you’d be wrong.  It is a spider wasp which hunts tarantulas.

Tarantulas have earned a deadly reputation as a predator capable of killing mice, lizards and small birds.  But the spiders are known to run in fear from the tarantula hawk.   The tarantula hawk wasp preys on its namesake, engaging in a ferocious battle that leads to the spider being paralyzed with a highly painful sting.   Once stung, the tarantula becomes paralyzed within seconds. The condition will last for the remainder of its life.   The tarantula hawk wasps then drag the sleeping spider – which can be up to eight times their weight – to a burrow, lay an egg on the tarantula and seal up the tunnel. The young wasp devours the tarantula in order to develop into an adult, eating the non-essential organs first to keep it alive for as long as possible.

Tarantula hawks have not only worked out how to successfully attack a predatory spider but also to reserve the best meals for their most valuable offspring. The wasps are able to decide the sex of their baby by choosing whether to fertilize the egg or not, fertilized eggs produce females while males come from unfertilized eggs.   Males, unlike females, do not have to find and battle tarantulas, they simply seek flowers and a mate and as a result they are not required to grow as large as females.

Females are not very aggressive, in that they are hesitant to sting.  So you don’t really stand a chance of being bitten by the fearless wasp, unless you do something incredibly stupid like handle the wasp… but the sting is extraordinarily painful.  The sting has been described as beyond imagination.  It only lasts about 2 to 3 minutes, but it is unsurpassed in intensity by any other stinging insect.

And if you do get bitten…

“There are some vivid descriptions of people getting hurt by these things,” says Ben Hutchins, invertebrate biologist at Texas Parks and Wildlife. “Their recommendation – and this was actually in a peer-reviewed journal – was to just lie down and start screaming, because few if any people could maintain verbal and physical coordination after getting stung by one of these things. You’re likely to just run off and hurt yourself. So just lie down and start yelling.”

 

Information courtesy of the BBC and Odditycentral.com

The photo below is of a Mexican Tarantula Wasp (Pepsis mexicana)

Searching for Stowe – a video presentation by Carol Crafts

Searching for Stowe – a video presentation by Carol Crafts

 

Hello, my name is Carol Crafts and I am a docent for the Sycamore Canyon/Goodan Ranch Open Space Preserves and the author of Goodan Ranch and Sycamore Canyon: A History of the Land: Then and Now.

I became involved with the Goodan Ranch when I met a granddaughter of the Goodan Family, through a program we were both involved in. While researching the history of the area for docents at the Preserve, I became fascinated by the township of Stowe.

Stowe was located at the top of Sycamore Canyon.   In the 1880s, families began settling in the area southeast of Poway and north of Santee along a well traveled route used by farmers taking produce to El Cajon as well as the train stops in Foster and Santee.  This route was recognized in 2003 as the Stowe Millennium Trail.   Homesteaders in Sycamore Canyon hoped to see the railroad go through Poway and connect them to the surrounding areas.

In 1884 families began to file homestead claims at land offices in Los Angles, which meant that they had already been living on the land for several years.   In 1889 a post office opened in Stowe receiving mail twice weekly.  By 1903 the office had 32 patrons.

1890 saw the opening of a school at the top of the canyon for the homesteader’s children.  The school originally served the children of eight families in the area.   By 1903 the Stowe school was closed and students went to either the Poway or Santee school districts.   The school house was sold for $25 and the wood was used to build another dwelling.   1905 saw the post office close as well.   While the town of Stowe remained on Triple A maps of the area until 1914, it was quickly dwindling away as families moved on.

Why did this town, which seemed so promising just a few years before, disappear so quickly?   After years of researching, I believe that the disappearance of Stowe is related to several different factors which came together to make Stowe a difficult place to live.   The railroad spur which had been planned to go through Poway, Stowe, and Ramona was canceled in 1896 leaving Stowe isolated and hard to reach.   This time period also saw some extreme weather in the area with alterations between torrential rains and drought making farming a difficult endeavor.   The twin challenges of uncertain weather and difficult transportation made Stowe a less than ideal place to live and many families from the Stowe area saw children marry and move into either Poway or Santee. Charlie Bottroff, son of the Stowe Post Master and Post Mistress, married Josie Fischer, daughter of the former Stowe Postmistress, and moved to Santee as a blacksmith. Other children moved to Poway or Escondido.

In the 1930’s, the Goodan family bought most of the Stowe land to add to their ranch.   Today the Goodan Ranch and surrounding area are jointly managed by the cities of Poway, Santee and the California Department of Fish and Game and is known as Sycamore Canyon/Goodan Ranch Open Spaces Preserves.   The Preserves contain more than 10 miles of hiking trails and allows horseback riding and bicycling. They are also home to a wide variety of plant and animal life. If you enjoy hiking, biking, or riding and are interested in San Diego County’s natural habitat please come and visit the preserves.  For more historical information about the township of Stowe or the Goodan Ranch, please visit the San Diego Historical Society, the Poway Historical Society, the Santee Historical Society, the Lakeside Historical Society Archives, or the El Cajon Historical Society. These wonderful institutions have made my own research into Stowe possible and hold the history of San Diego for those who care to look.